Visits to Basho-o sites

Basho’s birth house

BASYO-O SEIKA

Basho was born in 1644 in present-day , Iga City. From childhood, he served the family of Todo Shinshichiro, a samurai general in charge of Iga region of the Todo clan, and studied haikai under Sengin, the head of the family. After Sengin’s death Basho resigned from the lord’s family. Later he went on to Edo (Now Tokyo) and became a haikai master. His original pen name was Tosei. At age 37 he published Tosei Montei Dokugin Nijukkasen (Twenty Solo Kasen by Tosei’s Disciples), thereby gaining peominence in the haikai world. Eventually he established his new Basho Style haikai. He passed away at the age of 51 on October 12, 1694 while traveling in Osaka. >> MAP

Admission Adults: 300 yen (group: 200 yen)
Elementary, junior high and high school students: 100 yen (group: 60 yen * chaperons go free)
* Group rates apply to groups of 30 or more people.
Preschool children: free
Visitors with certificate of disability: free
Hours 8:30 am-5 pm * Last admission 4:30 pm
Closed Year-end and New Year holidays
Tel +81 (0595) 24-2711

CHOGETUKEN

CHOGETUKEN

Located behind Basho’s birth home, this is the cottage where Basho compiled and wrote Kai Oi (Shell Matching), his first collection of verses. When he returned to Iga, he stayed here. >> MAP

UENO TENJINGU

UENO TENJINGU

At age 29, When he was using the pen name Soubou, Basho compiled the verses of his haikai friends in Iga into the sanjuban kuawase (thirty verse matchings), which is titled Kai Oi (Shell Matching), and was dedicated to this shrine. >> MAP

MINOMUSHIAN

MINOMUSHIAN

This is one of Basho’s five hermitages, the other four being Mumyoan, Sairokuan, Torokuan, and Hyochikuan. Only Minomushian remains today. It originally belonged to Hattori Doho, one of Basho’s disciples. To commemorate the completion of the hermitage in March 1688, Basho wrote a verse: “minomushi no ne wo kikini koyo kusa no io(come and listen to the sound of bagworms thatched hermitage)”.
The name of the hermitage was thereby taken from the verse. At this hermitage Doho compiled Basho’s sayings and produced Sanzoshi (Three Color Notebooks). >> MAP

Admission Adults: 300 yen (group: 200 yen)
Elementary, junior high and high school students: 100 yen (group: 60 yen * chaperons go free)
* Group rates apply to groups of 30 or more people.
Preschool children: free
Visitors with certificate of disability: free
Hours 8:30 am-5 pm * Last admission 4:30 pm
Closed Year-end and New Year holidays
Tel +81 (0595) 23-8921

KOKYOUZUKA

KOKYOUZUKA

This temple, Henkozan Ganjoji, belongs to the Shingon sect, and is the family temple of Matsuo Basho. Since Aizenmyoo (Ragaraja or All-Accepting Diety) resides here, the temple is also called Aizen’in. In the temple ground rests Basho’s grave which contains his hair. The grave was restored during the cultual renaissance in the 18th century by Chogetsuan Jakuo, a samurai of the Omura clan in Kyushu. During the Meiji period Ozaki Koyo and Emi Suiin paid a visit here and had their picture taken, which is still preserved intact. >> MAP

HAISEIDEN

HAISEIDEN

This hall was built in 1942 by the late Kawasaki Katsu to commemorate the 300th anniversary of Basho’s birth. The building represents Basho’s traveling style: The round roof is his sedge hat, the octagonal lower roof his straw raincoat, the pillars his walking stick, and the wooden frame of the building arranged as the face. Inside the hall is a statue of a meditating Basho. Its prototype was sculpted by Hasegawa Eisaku, a member of the Academy of Art, and fired into Iga earthenware by Kawasaki Katsu. >> MAP

Basho Memorial Museum

Basho Memorial Museum

As a tribute to Basho this museum was built in 1959 with funds donated by Kanbe Mannosuke. Its Basho Library preserves Basho’s own writings as well as many documents representing pre-modern renga and haikai literature, which are on display.
>> Detail of Basho Memorial Museum